Photographs from the Tom Birch Collection

January 26 - March 2, 2019

DANNY LYON

Ellis Unit, 1968, Printed c. 1982

gelatin silver print, mounted, signed below image

7½" x 11"

RUTH THORNE-THOMSEN

Thunderhead, Colorado, Ed 14/25, 1986

toned gelatin silver print, contact printed from film

6" x 5"

 

LEE FRIEDLANDER

New York City, 1964

gelatin silver print, signed in pencil on verso

8¼" x 12¼"

 

ANSEL ADAMS

Yosemite Falls in Spring, Printed c. 1975

gelatin silver print, mounted, initialed below image

9.5" x 7"

ANDRÉ GELPKE

Florenz [horse in fountain], 1978

gelatin silver print

12½" x 8½"

STEVE SZABO

Wye River Series #1

gelatin silver print, mounted and signed below image

8" x 7¼"

There is something inherently strange about a photograph: its pretense of veracity, the illusion of an unpremeditated subject, and the feeling of an unmediated presence. Herein lies the beauty of the medium and the opportunity for collecting photographs to become an adventure. A collection of photographs can tell us many things. In the best photography collections, each photograph is a knot on a thread leading to ever deeper and more penetrating experiences of beauty. Sometimes it is an elusive beauty captured from the real world. Other times beauty is exposed within something boring, horrible or shocking, revealed by the craft of the photographer and the willingness of the viewer to engage.

The Tom Birch Collection tells us he collected fearlessly, always reaching for the next new beauty. In reviewing personal collections one becomes used to seeing the predictable pantomiming of the reassuring qualities of the museum’s canon. One sees collections based on themes that barely recognize the inner dynamic of individual artworks. Some collections reflect only the desire to soothe, never to challenge, when so much more can be experienced. It is clear Tom Birch was spurred onward by a willingness to explore the widest range of what photography had to offer. This manner of collecting nudges the idea of taste away from a fixed set of rules into an evolving narrative of personal discovery. For Tom, each photograph is a moment on a clock spinning backwards through his life, telling him of the places his consciousness occupied before and then after acquiring each picture.

Some collections are broken up among heirs, some rightly go to institutions, and others are sold. In the selling of the Birch collection there is the goal of setting the artworks free to travel into the hearts and minds of other people, expanding their experiences of strange and wonderful beauty. Now, it is time for each of the photographs to become milestones in other collectors’ lives.

Photographs from the Tom Birch Collection includes works by the below artists:

Ansel Adams

Merry Alpern

Manuel Álvarez Bravo

A. Clarke Bedford

Zeke Berman

Karl Blossfeldt

Félix Bonfils

William Dassonville

Robert Frank

Lee Friedlander

André Gelpke

Jan Groover

Graciela Iturbide

André Kertész

Yevgeny Khaldei

Jacques-Henri Lartigue

Helen Levitt

Danny Lyon

Ralph Steiner

Steve Szabo

Ruth Thorne-Thomsen

George Tice

Joel-Peter Witkin