Workingman Collective: SATELLITE

Workingman Collective: SATELLITE

‘Satellite,’ an artistic homage to a relic of a restless age

July 16, 2015

Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

"The local collaborative-art group, whose core members are Tom Ashcraft and Peter Winant, began constructing an oversize wooden model of Intelsat I in April. The sculpture will be on display in a vacant storefront at 17th and L streets NW until the end of the month, when it will literally disappear. Because the doors are too small to accommodate the mock satellite, the artists must disassemble it to remove it."

REPRESENT

REPRESENT

At Hemphill Fine Arts, a retrospective show that's bigger than the gallery

November 15, 2013

Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

"Several mini-shows nestle within “Represent,” Hemphill Fine Arts’s 20th-anniversary exhibition."

Artist-Citizen, Washington, DC

Artist-Citizen, Washington, DC

A quartet of gallery summer group shows

July 12, 2013

Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

"If the personal is political, these grandiose, dysfunctional structures are calling artist-citizens to take to the streets (or, more likely, cul-de-sacs)."

Artist-Citizen, Washington, DC

Artist-Citizen, Washington, DC

"Artist-Citizen" at Hemphill, Reviewed

June 14, 2013

Matthew Smith, Washington City Paper

"The show focuses on artistic civic engagement—artists that are out of their studios and walking the streets. Mostly culled from the gallery’s stable of artists, 'Artist-Citizen' presents works that speak through the city itself."

Workingman Collective: Prospects and Provisions

Workingman Collective: Prospects and Provisions

Workingman Collective

November 1, 2011

Anne Reeve, Art in America

"The artworks on display (all 2011) are invitations."

Workingman Collective: Prospects and Provisions

Workingman Collective: Prospects and Provisions

Workingman Collective’s conceptual, outdoorsy art at Hemphill

July 7, 2011

Mark Jenkins, The Washington Post

"The congenial, if slightly odd, event was rendered a little stranger by its setting: an elegantly constructed cherry-wood picnic table with a built-in loop of elevated model-railroad track. A three-car G-scale train trundled a few feet above the lunchers’ heads, as Ashcraft and Winant discussed Heidegger, ideation, go-go music and a project they’re planning for Haitian orphanages."